This deep, rich green is fit for subjects both earthy and regal.

In a sense, the name “forest green” is a misnomer, because as artists well know, leaves and mosses are never a single color, much less a single value. Nevertheless, forest green does evoke the overall impression of foliage—the sort of thick canopy that can block midday sun during a summer hike through the woods.

Calm Connection

When the color finds its way into domestic spaces, it can lend a degree of earthiness and calm. This connection with nature is apparent in Still Life With Teapot, Cup and Fruit by Émile Bernard (1868–1941), in which the colors of the man-made objects seem to take their cue from the color of the fruit. But in other hands, this shade of green can be a luxurious color, suitable for objects far less humble than Bernard’s collection of charming ceramics.

Still Life With Teapot, Cup and Fruit by Émile Bernard 1890; oil on canvas, 15⅓ x18½

Still Life With Teapot, Cup and Fruit by Émile Bernard 1890; oil on canvas, 15⅓ x18½

PILLARS OF LIFE

This depiction of Osiris, found on a pillar in a burial chamber, features green skin, signifying resurrection. This association began with the ancient Egyptians’ observation of the death-and-rebirth cycle of vegetation.

KAIROINFO4U/FLICKR

KAIROINFO4U/FLICKR

GREEN MEANS GO

“British racing green,” seen here on a 1964 Jaguar E-Type S1 Roadster, is the official motor-racing color of the United Kingdom. The color’s association with auto racing dates back to a 1903 race held in Ireland. The cars were painted deep green as a show of respect to the host country.

B&M Noskowski / Getty Images

B&M Noskowski / Getty Images

GREEN IS JUST THE BEGINNING

No matter the application, Derwent has a colored pencil that will suit your needs. Choose from soft and blendable Coloursoft pencils to hard, smooth Procolour, the all new UV resistant, oil-based Lightfast pencils, and many more. Derwent offers professional quality colored pencils, all made in the UK.

derwent forest green

 

HOME TO ROOST

Mallards are known as dabbling ducks and are at home in almost any wetland environment, natural or manmade. But with those bright green heads and necks, they are attention-getters wherever they go.

Nigel Bowers / Getty Images

Nigel Bowers / Getty Images

A GIFT FROM THE RIVER

Agate has been mined since ancient times, including by the Egyptians, who used it to decorate a myriad of items. Agate is named after the Achates River (now called the Dirillo), an ancient source of the stone in Sicily.

Getty Images

Getty Images

Exploring Color

Master everything about color from hue and value to intensity to create landscape paintings that captivate. Color: Landscape Painting Techniques for Success video download shows you how. Download your copy now!

Show us your green-inspired art for a chance to win a bundle of art swag! Follow and tag us on Instagram @artistsnetwork using #ArtistsNetwork_ColorStory.

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Article contributions by Mike Allen.